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Mission


About Us

 

Take Me Home

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Mission


About Us

 

Take Me Home

Several years back, one of our family members passed away due to a misdiagnosis of chest pain. So, we got together and asked, "Can we use artificial intelligence to help improve chest pain management?" At Heart I/O, we believe our work is going to change medicine. Until then, we’ll keep frying laptops, burning GPU’s, and wearing out keyboards doing what we do best.

Empowering people with reliable data, improving the delivery model, and maximizing patient health – that’s our goal.


Recent Advances

ED-based rapid diagnostic protocols, observation-based care protocols, clinical decision rules, sequencing of services, novel imaging modalities, high-sensitivity troponins, decision aids, risk calculators, etc.


False Positives

High sensitivity troponin assays are incredibly valuable for clinicians due to their effectiveness at ruling-in disease. However, these blood tests are not highly specific and result in false positives.


False Negatives

Despite risk stratification and sensitivity improvements, some unhealthy patients are discharged and then later experience a major adverse cardiac event (MACE). This is partially why ~20% of ED malpractice dollars are related to chest pain.

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Goal


Clinicians and investigators have been hacking away at chest pain for >3 decades, looking for the elusive holy grail solution to this quandary: a single tool or combination of tools that perfectly sorts patients presenting to the ED with chest pain for which acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a consideration into those at high enough risk to require further diagnostic work versus those at low enough risk to be safely discharged. - Keith E. Kocher, MD, MPH

Goal


Clinicians and investigators have been hacking away at chest pain for >3 decades, looking for the elusive holy grail solution to this quandary: a single tool or combination of tools that perfectly sorts patients presenting to the ED with chest pain for which acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a consideration into those at high enough risk to require further diagnostic work versus those at low enough risk to be safely discharged. - Keith E. Kocher, MD, MPH

From Dorm Room to Bedside

At Heart I/O, we’re using data from resting electrocardiograms to teach deep learning algorithms how to make patient predictions and identify clinically significant disease. We’re building an inexpensive cloud-based tool to help emergency providers rapidly and effectively sort patients that need further diagnostic testing versus those that can be safely discharged. Our technology is not yet cleared for commercial use in the U.S.


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What Emergency Providers want

  • Timely: Time-to-decision is imperative within the ED

  • Integrated: Easily fits into the traditional workflow

  • Sensitive: Minimize # of missed Major Adverse Cardiac Events


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What Patients Want

  • Safe: Risks of missed events are balanced with risks of unnecessary testing

  • Maximize Health & Care: Reductions in uncertainty, improved understanding of care options, greater convenience, less waiting, and avoid procedures that do not lead to improvements

  • Cheap: Quality care at the best price


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What payors want

  • Specific: Limit expenditures on patients without disease

  • Cost Effective: Derive maximum value for resources consumed


Differential Diagnoses

Pneumonia, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pulmonary embolism, hyperventilation, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal spasm, peptic ulcer, gallbladder disease, pancreatitis, costochondritis, rib fracture, etc.

*Note: List is not fully exhaustive.


Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS): unstable angina, STEMI, NSTEMI.

Angina: chest discomfort when the heart does not receive enough blood due to blockages in the coronary arteries.

Arterial Stenosis: a narrowing within arteries that can obstruct blood flow.

Atherosclerosis: the accumulation of lipoproteins, cellular products, calcium, etc. inside an artery.

Cardiac Catheterization (Cath): invasive procedure used to diagnose coronary artery disease.

Cardiac Ischemia: a restriction of blood flow to the heart.

Coronary Angiography: invasive procedure using X-rays and contrast agents to visualize coronary lumens.

Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG): surgery that creates a new path for blood to flow to the heart.

Coronary Artery Disease (CAD): disease caused by atherosclerotic luminal narrowing in coronary arteries, limiting a sufficient supply of blood to the myocardium.

Electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG): recording of the electrical activity of the heart.

False-Negative: negative result when the condition is present.

False-Positive: positive result when the condition is not present.

Major Adverse Cardiac Event (MACE): acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, coronary angiography revealing stenosis, and death of any cause.

Myocardial Infarction: a "heart attack" that causes permanent damage to cardiomyocytes in the myocardium.

NSTEMI: Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI): procedure that uses a catheter to place a stent to open up pathways that have been narrowed by plaque buildup.

STEMI: ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.


 

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